Wildlife Trust Derbyshire Wildlife Trust
East Mill, Bridge Foot, Belper, Derbyshire, DE56 1XH
Tel: 01773 881188 Fax: 01773 821826
E-mail: enquiries@derbyshirewt.co.uk

Derby Junction Ponds
(Chaddesden Sidings)

Derby Junction (Chaddesden Sidings)



Derbyshire Wildlife Trust
East Mill
Bridgefoot
Belper
Derbyshire
DE56 1XH
A report for the Wild About Ponds Project
Prepared by Trevor Taylor
Local Wildlife Sites Officer (Planning)
Derbyshire Wildlife Trust

November 2010

Protecting Wildlife for the future

Regisered charity no. 222212
DWT is a company registered in England and Wales
with the Company Number 715675

Derby Junction Ponds, Chaddesden Sidings

Background

Derbyshire Wildlife Trust was commissioned to survey the ponds as part of the Wild About Ponds Project in order to compare survey results against data obtained as part of the 2004/5 Derby City Pond Survey.

Map 1 shows the location of the ponds. The 2004/5 Derby City Pond Survey identified the presence of three ponds on the site from visits undertaken during summer 2004 and spring 2005. The current survey identified two ponds on the site and confirmed that one pond (Pond 2) had been infilled between the period 2005 to 2011. It is acknowledged that the steep banks and deep water associated with Pond 2 presented significant health and safety concerns. The surrounding land has also been re-profiled during this intervening period and one of the ponds (pond 3) has been significantly reduced in size as a result of the re-profiling works which has resulted in the loss of the drawdown zone at the northern end of the pond.

The 2004/5 survey identified two of the ponds (Pond 1 and Pond 3) as being two of the highest quality ponds in Derby City with both attaining a PSYM score of 83% placing them as two of only three ponds in Derby City to fall in the "good" condition category. As such the ponds would meet the criteria as UK BAP priority habitat. All three ponds supported extensive and significant populations of the stonewort, Chara vulgaris var. papillata, which is considered to be uncommon, particularly within the context of Derby City. Additionally, Pond 3 was identified to support Common Toad, a UK BAP priority species, Common Frog and Smooth Newt as well as three uncommon plant species namely Myriophyllum spicatum, Spiked Water-milfoil, Potamogeton pusilus, Lesser Pondweed and Ranunculus aquatilis, Common Water-crowfoot. Pond 3 is used by Lafarge as the water source to fill a tractor mounted bowser in order to wash down the site access roads.

Pond 2, which has now been infilled, was known to support Water Stick Insect and was considered to be in "fair" ecological condition with a PSYM score of 61%.

Survey objectives

The aim of the survey was to gather ecological information using the PSYM methodology in order to determine the current overall ecological quality of the ponds.

Methodology

The survey followed the standard survey methodology known as PSYM developed by Pond Action (now Pond Conservation) and the Environment Agency. PSYM, the Predictive System for Multimetrics, (pronounced sim) was developed to provide a standard method for assessing the biological qualities of still waters in England and Wales.

The method uses a number of aquatic plant and invertebrate measures (known as metrics) which are combined together and fed into a computer model, along with basic environmental and location data, to obtain a single value which represents the waterbody’s overall quality status.

The following information was gathered for the pond:

Calculating the pond metrics

The data collected from the surveys are used to calculate three plant metrics and three invertebrate metrics.

1. Number of submerged and emergent plant species

This is simply the number of submerged plant species plus the number of emergent plant species. The calculation does not include the number of floating-leaved species present. This is because the pond data suggest that the number of floating-leaved plants

occurring at a site does not decline significantly with increasing degradation. The metric is therefore improved by omitting this plant group.

2. Trophic Ranking Score (TRS)

TRS is a measure of the average trophic rank for the pond. This is calculated by assigning each plant species with a trophic score based on its affinity to waters of a particular nutrient status. The trophic scores vary between 2.5 (dystrophic, i.e. very nutrient poor conditions) and eutrophic, i.e. nutrient rich conditions).

Unfortunately, not all plants have trophic scores. This situation has arisen because the current TRS values for standing waters (Palmer et al., 1992) are based only on analysis of lake data, and many plant species which are common in ponds occurred at too low a frequency in lakes to give them a score. Also, some plant species exhibit little nutrient preference.

The TRS value for a site is calculated as follows:

  1. The trophic scores from each plant species present at the site are summed together.
  2. The summed score is divided by the total number of plant species which have a trophic ranking score to give the TRS.
3. Uncommon Species Index

Uncommon species are those which have a rarity score of 2 or more. The number of these species is simply summed to give the number of uncommon species.

Uncommon species refers to species which can be best described as "local", "nationally scarce" or "Red Data Book". The rarity status values for Scarce and Red Data Book species are based on existing definitions derived from the Red data Books and other authorities. The definition of "local" has been used to define species which are not uniformly common and widespread in Britain: with plants this refers specifically to species recorded from between 100 and 700 10 x 10 km squares in England, Wales and Scotland.

4. Average Score per Taxon (ASPT)

The ASPT is calculated by summing the BMWP scores for all taxa present at the site and dividing by the total number of BMWP taxa present.
BMWP (Biological Monitoring Working Party) scores are assigned to taxa depending on their known tolerance to organic pollution, a higher score indicating lower tolerance. The scores were defined by Maitland in 1977.

5. Number of dragonfly and alderfly families.

This metric is the sum of the number of dragonfly (Odonata) and alderfly (Megaloptera) families.

6. Number of beetle families

This metric is the sum of the number of beetle (Coleoptera) families present at the site. The metric has a relationship with bank quality as well as water quality.

Results

The pond was surveyed using the PSYM methodology enabling an assessment of its biological quality to be made together with a comparison with other ponds in the area.

The PSYM scores are placed in four categories which reflect the ecological quality of the pond:

0-25% is very poor, 26-50% is poor, 51-75% is fair, and 76-100% is good

Site and sample details

Grid reference: SK 36412 35899

Site Name: Junction Pond 1

Location: Former Chaddesden Sidings site north of River Derwent

Owner/site access details: Network Rail - Access permitted via site tenants Lafarge

Survey Date: 24th August 2010Surveyors: Trevor Taylor (Derbyshire Wildlife Trust)

Environmental Data

Altitude: (m)41m aslpH:8.20
Shade: % pond overhung:5%% emergent plant cover15%
Inflow (absent = 0, present = 1):0Pond area (m2)1600m2
% of pond margin grazed:0

Pond base: categories into one of three groups; 1=0%-32%, 2=33%-66%, 3=67%-100%)

Clay/silt:1Sand, gravel, cobbles:3Bed rock:1
Peat1Other1
Emergent plants Rarity Score Trophic Ranking Score
 
Alisma plantago-aquqtica, Water-plantain19
Epilobium hirsutum, Great Willowherb1-
Filipendula ulmaria, Meadowsweet1-
Galium palustre, Common Marsh-bedstraw1-
Impatiens glandulifera, Indian Balsam1-
Juncus articulatus, Jointed Rush 1 -
Juncus inflexus, Hard Rush1-
Lysimachia nummularia, Creeping-Jenny1-
Lythrum salicaria, Purple loosestrife1-
Rorippa nasturtium-aquaticum, Watercress110
Solanum dulcamara, Bittersweet110
Typha latifolia, Bulrush18.5
 
Floating-leaved plants
 
Lemna minor, Common Duckweed19
 
Submerged plants
Callitriche spp, Water-starwort1-
Myriophyllum spicatum, Spiked Water-milfoil29

Number of emergent and submerged species – 14
Number of uncommon species (with a rarity score of 2 or more) – 1

Trophic Ranking Score – 9.25

Macroinvertebrates
Group 4 taxa (BMWP:8)
Gammaridae – Crustacean, Shrimp
Coenagriidae – Damselfly

Group 5 taxa (BMWP:5)
Gerridae – Water bug Water skater
Nepidae - Water bug Water stick insect
Naucoridae – Water bug Saucer bug
Corixidae - Water bug Lesser water boatman
Notonectidae – Water bug Greater water boatman
Pleidae – Water bug
Hygrobiidae – Water beetle (Screech beetle)
Dytiscidae – Water beetle Diving
Hydrophilidae – Water beetle Scavenger beetle

Group 6 taxa (BMWP:4)
Baetidae - Mayfly

Group 7 taxa (BMWP:3)
Planorbidae - Ramshorn snail
Sphaeridae - Pea Mussel
Hydrobiidae – Snail Jenkins Spire Shell
Lymnaeidae – Snail Lymnaea stagnalis
Glossiphoniidae – Leech Helobdella stagnalis
Asellidae – Crustacean Water slater

Group 8 taxa (BMWP:2)
Chironomidae - Fly (non biting midge)
Group 9 taxa (BMWP:1)
Oligochaetae - True worm

Total No. Of taxa20
Total BMWP Score82
ASPT4.1
No. OM taxa1
No. Coleopt taxa3

Index of Biotic Integrity (PSYM Score %) = 56. As such the pond would be considered to be in fair ecological condition.


Chaddesden Sidings 2010

Junction Pond - 1 2010

Chaddesden Sidings 2004

Junction Pond - 1 2004

Survey results

The pond continues to maintain a relatively good range of aquatic plant and macroinvertebrate species although there has been a noticeable decline in the number of uncommon submerged plant species since 2004. This is reflected in the marked reduction in the PSYM scores from 83% in 2004 to 56% in 2010 representing a decline in the overall ecological quality.

No amphibians were recorded from Pond 1 in 2005 which was found to contain a number of fish including numerous three-spined stickleback, perch and a very large carp species. However, smooth newt larvae were recorded from the pond in 2011 and no evidence of fish was noted.

The pond is fringed with occasional specimens of semi-mature Alder and Osier and a plantation of mature Alder, Sycamore and Grey Willow is present on the southern bank

Stonewort is still present in quantity and Water stick insect is present in good numbers

Stonewort

Above: Stonewort

Water Stick Insect

Above: Water Stick Insect

Site and sample details

Grid reference: SK 36446 35893

Site Name: Junction Pond 3

Location: Former Chaddesden Sidings site north of River Derwent

Owner/site access details: Network Rail - Access permitted via site tenants Lafarge

Survey Date: 24th August 2010Surveyors: Trevor Taylor (Derbyshire Wildlife Trust)

Environmental data

Altitude: (m)46m aslpH:7.9
Shade: % pond overhung:3%% emergent plant cover5%
Inflow (absent = 0, present = 1):0Pond area (m2)1800m2
% of pond margin grazed:0

Pond base: categories into one of three groups; 1=0%-32%, 2=33%-66%, 3=67%-100%)

Clay/silt:1Sand, gravel, cobbles:3Bed rock:1
Peat1Other1

Emergent plants Rarity Score Trophic Ranking Score
 
Alisma plantago-aquqtica, Water-plantain19
Epilobium hirsutum, Great Willowherb1-
Filipendula ulmaria, Meadowsweet1-
Impatiens glandulifera, Indian Balsam1-
Phalaris arundinacea, Reed Canary-grass18.5
Scrophularia auriculata, Water Figwort1-
Typha latifolia, Bulrush18.5
 
Submerged plants
Potamogeton pectinatus, Fennel Pondweed110
Potamogeton pusillus, Lesser Pondweed29

Number of emergent and submerged species – 9
Number of uncommon species (with a rarity score of 2 or more) – 1

Trophic Ranking Score – 9.00

Macroinvertebrates
Group 2 taxa (BMWP:8)
Aeshnidae Dragonfly

Group 4 taxa (BMWP:8)
Gammaridae – Crustacean, Shrimp
Coenagriidae – Blue-tailed Damselfly


Group 5 taxa (BMWP:5)
Planariidae - Flatworm
Naucoridae – Water bug Saucer bug
Notonectidae – Water bug Greater water boatman
Pleidae – Water bug
Hygrobiidae – Water beetle (Screech beetle)
Dytiscidae – Water beetle Hyphydrus ovatus

Group 6 taxa (BMWP:4)
Baetidae - Mayfly

Group 7 taxa (BMWP:3)
Planorbidae - Ramshorn snail
Hydrobiidae – Snail Jenkins Spire Shell
Lymnaeidae – Snail Lymnaea stagnalis
Glossiphoniidae – Leech Helobdella stagnalis
Asellidae – Crustacean Water slater
Physidae – Snail Physa acuta

Group 8 taxa (BMWP:2)
Chironomidae - Fly (non biting midge)

Total No. Of taxa18
Total BMWP Score79
ASPT4.4
No. OM taxa2
No. Coleopt taxa2




Index of Biotic Integrity (PSYM Score %) = 56. As such the pond would be considered to be in fair ecological condition.

Chaddesden Sidings 2010

Junction Pond - 3 2010

Chaddesden Sidings 2004

Junction Pond - 3 2004

Survey results

The pond continues to maintain a relatively good range of aquatic plant and macroinvertebrate species although there has been a noticeable decline in the number of uncommon submerged plant species since 2004. This is reflected in the marked reduction in the PSYM scores from 83% in 2004 to 61% in 2010 representing a decline in the overall ecological quality. One of the most noticeable observations during the current survey is the lack of stonewort in pond 3 in comparison to the luxurious growth recorded in 2004. This may be attributable to the loss of the drawdown zone at the northern end of the pond which may have been an important aspect of the stonewort population.

Following the re-profiling of the surrounding land, the pond has steeply sloping, generally bare, banks with occasional scattered immature trees comprised of Alder, Ash, Hawthorn, Silver Birch, White Willow, Grey Willow and Osier. Dense Bramble cover is present along the southern bank and occasional narrow bands of emergent vegetation occur around the pond.

Recommendations

Whilst there are no specific management issues, it is recommended that the landowners are made aware of the biodiversity value of the ponds in order for consideration to be given to the retention of the ponds as part of any future development proposals which may affect the site.

Chaddesden Sidings

Junction Pond - 2 - lost to infilling between 2005 and 2011


Chaddesden Sidings Map